5

I'm wondering why Installing GDAL with Python on windows? is a community wiki. I might be missing something but I currently don't see a reason. Could it simply have been a mistake?

1 Answer 1

5

I looked at the history of this question using a mod tool, and it was the asker that made their question Community Wiki.

I suspect that why they did that is alluded to when they said:

if someone would be so kind to walk me through the process, including links to the files/folders I will need I would be happy to do a screen cast to continue to share this with the rest of the world

I think they realized that the question was likely to be closed as too broad, and sought to "protect" it by giving its ownership to the community.

As commented by @whuber, this is:

a common misconception: CW is not intended as a way of permitting unfocused or off-topic questions. It is always available to users who want to encourage public editing of the answers, regardless of the nature of their question.

If asked today, I think that question, as written (i.e. asking for step by step instructions), would be quickly closed as too broad. However, if it were edited to focus on an error message like the one shown, then it would become more focussed and on-topic.

In neither case would I choose to apply Community Wiki to such a question.

1
  • 2
    Re your last remark, which might be misinterpreted as alluding to a common misconception: CW is not intended as a way of permitting unfocused or off-topic questions. It is always available to users who want to encourage public editing of the answers, regardless of the nature of their question. If you currently think an old (but potentially useful) question should be closed, then an appealing option is to lock it as being of historical interest.
    – whuber
    Commented Jul 28, 2015 at 15:54

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .