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Numbers display strangely in the font used for titles in the new site theme.

Numbers 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 hang below the string horizontal gravity center. Examples here.

Numbers 0, 1 and 2 are shrunken. Examples here.

Most of these are minor, cosmetic issues. But when it comes to the number zero, it's a problem. The number zero looks like the letter 'o'.

For example, I saw this question and thought, "Why does this person want to store a letter in a raster cell? Rasters only store numbers, do they not understand how rasters work? ...Wait, can you store a letter in a raster?" > Down the rabbit hole searching for "storing letters in rasters." Did not get around to answering the question.

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This was raised by @AndreSilva in their answer to GIS's updated site theme is live!

@Catija (Stack Exchange staff member) commented there that:

This isn't a display problem, it's how Georgia renders numbers, actually. Our default serif font is Georgia.

and:

... here's an example on Physics. Sites with sans serif fonts use Arial, which has all of the numbers on the same baseline.

and:

There's some generally broad concerns about Georgia from a few different sites - particularly in relation to numbers. We may have to reconsider it as our choice for serifed font... but my understanding is that all sites with the same style of font (serif vs sans) will have the same font stack.

For your feature request to progress I think that it would need to focus on having the GIS Stack Exchange site cease using Georgia font and begin using a font (like Arial) which has all of the numbers on the same baseline instead.

I do not know the history behind Georgia font being chosen for GIS SE and, personally, I would be happy for us to use Arial instead.

There seem to be a number of Meta SE Q&As about issues with the new responsive design and Georgia font but nothing that I could see related specifically to numbers.

An answer by @Shog9 (SE staff member) over at the Linux & Unix Meta may also be relevant.

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