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I noticed that there is a trend to be less specific in wording questions and that more questions are becoming mere titles rather then questions.

Is wording question properly something we should encourage or can we just go ahead and edit?

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    can you provide some specific examples? Sep 24, 2011 at 9:36

1 Answer 1

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Yes, it is encouraged. Yes, please go ahead and edit. (I tried editing titles systematically for a few days but it got to be too much work. Your help, and that of others with similar sensitivities and skills, is valuable and appreciated.)

A good title is formulated as a question, is grammatically correct, uses consistent capitalization, occupies one line or less, and clearly indicates the main point. We cannot always achieve all these ideals, but usually we can come close with a little thought.

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  • +1 If the title contains the same text as a tag in a non-grammatic fashion, should we be removing the tag text from the title? Example. Sep 22, 2011 at 18:48
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    @Kirk Definitely fix the misspelling. Because tags are treated differently than text or titles, it's important to choose the tags carefully. There's no concern about redundancy there. (Tags get wikis; they get synonyms; they are searched differently; they contribute in various ways to several badges.)
    – whuber
    Sep 22, 2011 at 20:17
  • If a moderator modifies a post, is there a way to see what was done? Can a moderator add a comment stating what was done? That might help people craft better titles and descriptions as time goes on. I find it frustrating when every recent question has been edited without any idea what changed.
    – mkennedy
    Sep 27, 2011 at 0:13
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    @mkennedy When a message has been edited, no matter by whom, directly beneath it you will see a link like "edited xx hours ago." Clicking on it shows the entire history of edits in markup mode. As far as I know, all edits except for tag edits are recorded in this way.
    – whuber
    Sep 27, 2011 at 3:58
  • @whuber, Thanks, Bill. I think I'm going to plead obliviousness!
    – mkennedy
    Sep 27, 2011 at 6:26

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